The last scientific record of the "lost species" of elephant shrew was in the 1970s, despite local sightings. The Somali Sengi is among the least well-known of the 19 species of sengis, or elephant-shrews, which are restricted to Africa. The last scientific record of the "lost species" of elephant shrew was in the 1970s, despite local sightings. Scientists working in the Horn of Africa have documented the existence of a remarkable little mammal called the elephant shrew, or Somali sengi, for the first time since the 1970s. The elephant-shrew was on the organization's 25 Most Wanted Lost Species list. Elephant shrews, or sengis, are neither elephants nor shrews, but related to aardvarks, elephants and manatees. Elephantulus revoili Elephant shrews, also called jumping shrews or sengis, are small insectivorous mammals native to Africa, belonging to the family Macroscelididae, in the order Macroscelidea. "You can imagine if you're a small mouse-sized mammal in the super-arid desert rocky landscapes and you smell something one night that smells like Marmite and peanut butter, you're gonna go to check that out," he said. The creature was found alive and well in Djibouti, a country in the Horn of Africa, during a scientific expedition. This adorable little baby was found safe and sound in Djibouti, a country in the Horn of Africa, by a group of scientists. It occurs in a remote and arid area of northern Somalia and Somaliland. Individuals can grow to 32.5 g. Reproduction is dioecious. Source: CNN. The Somali Sengi, also called the Somali Elephant-shrew, is a mouse-size African mammal with a long and flexible nose that it waggles to and fro. "It's really a fascinating combination of mammal traits that aren't really found in any other order of mammals," he said. Scientists have rediscovered a mouse-sized mammal called the Somali elephant shrew or Somali sengi. In some parts of northern Somalia, the Somali sengi and rufous sengi may be locally sympatric. [3] The split with the Petrodromus-Petrosaltator clade is estimated to have occurred about 20.6 million years ago. The Somali elephant shrew or Somali sengi (Galegeeska revoilii) is a species of elephant shrew in the family Macroscelididae. The mammal has been documented for the first since the 1970s. Despite its formidable-sounding name, the Somali elephant shrew or sengi is tiny. It is an invertivore. A tiny elephant shrew species has been rediscovered in the Horn of Africa after 50 years. The creature was found alive and well in Djibouti, a country in the Horn of Africa, during a scientific expedition.. It was formerly classified in the genus Elephantulus, but a 2020 study found it to be the sister taxon of the clade containing the genera Petrodromus and Petrosaltator; due to this, it was reclassified in the monotypic genus Galegeeska. The Somali sengi was rediscovered in August after being missing for over 50 years. Read more: mongabay.com A tiny 'elephant' has been rediscovered in Africa, 'Precious' footage from 1935 of last-known Tasmanian tiger released, Hero shrews have strong, interlocking spines unlike any other animal, study says. In fact, it is a close relative of other trunk-nosed creatures like aardvarks, elephants, and manatees. The Somali elephant shrew, known for its curiously long snout, has been found in the African wild for the first time in more than 50 years. Scientists found an elephant shrew, or Somali sengi, in Djibouti for the first time in 50 years. "In the scientific community we try to use a reserved language that would classify the animals as 'charismatic microfauna,' which translates from science speak to normal speak as 'adorable little animals.'". Somali Elephant Shrews are also known as: Somali Sengi Little is known about the Somali Elephant Shrew but it is presumed that their characteristics, diet, breeding and predators are similar to those of other elephant shrews. The Somali sengi, an elephant shrew that seemingly vanished the face of the Earth 52 years ago, has been rediscovered. Macroscelides revoilii Huet, 1881. Image credits: zoofanatic. For half a century scientists feared that the Somali elephant shrew had vanished from the face of the Earth. The elephant-shrew was on the organization’s 25 Most Preferred Lost Species record.. GWC introduced the 1st scientific documentation of a stay Somali sengi in the variety of a photograph showing the mouse-like animal standing on some rocks. Stories worth watching (10 Videos) A tiny 'elephant' has been rediscovered in Africa. The team also included global elephant shrew expert Galen Rathburn, who had studied the creatures for many years. A mouse-sized elephant shrew that had been lost to science for 50 years has been discovered alive and well in the Horn of Africa.. Another interesting trait is the animal's long hind limbs, which means they are highly adapted to running. The small insectivorous mammal endemic to Somalia was deemed extinct since the 1970s by the Global Wildlife Conservation’s list of lost species. Long-lost Somali elephant shrew found in Horn of Africa. But the tiny mammal with its probing trunk-like nose was quietly thriving in the arid, rocky landscape of the Horn of … (CNN)Scientists working in the Horn of Africa have documented the existence of a remarkable little mammal called the Somali elephant shrew -- or Somali sengi -- for the first time since the 1970s. Elephantulus revoilii The Somali elephant shrew or Somali sengi (Galegeeska revoilii) is a species of elephant shrew in the family Macroscelididae. Though the Somali elephant shrew was thought to be a lost species, locals of East Africa identified the animal easily in pictures. Elephantulus revoili (Somali Elephant Shrew) is a species of mammals in the family elephant shrews or sengis. But Heritage said Rathburn had never before seen a live Somali sengi. The creature was found alive and well in Djibouti, a country in the Horn … The last scientific record of the "lost species" of elephant shrew was in the 1970s, despite local sightings. The mouse-size Somali sengi — a kind of elephant shrew with a pointy nose and large, adorable eyes — was thought to be a lost species. Latest stories. The Somali Sengi, also known as the Somali Elephant Shrew, is back after a 50-year hiatus. The team set more than 1,200 live-traps using bait made from peanut butter, oatmeal and yeast -- a far cry from the sengi's normal diet of ants and termites, but Heritage explained why it's not such a strange choice. A little-known mammal related to an elephant but as small as a mouse has been rediscovered in Africa after 50 years of obscurity. The mammals also form monogamous mating pairs for life, and live in a fairly small home range that's exclusive from other pairs, added Heritage.